After taking on the mantle God of War after killing her mentor War. Diana have shown some new abilities. She can now telepathically communicate and control all soldiers on the planet since she is their greatest leader. She hasn't shown the ability, but as her predecessor was able to bring back dead soldiers to fight alongside him, she might be able to do so as well.
In the comics, the gods alert the Amazons to an encroaching threat from Man’s World; Hippolyta calls for a contest of skill to determine the greatest warrior, who will be sent off to thwart the menace. Despite being forbidden by her mother from competing, a disguised Diana handily bests her sisters in various events — including jousting atop the island’s indigenous Kangas (Diana’s giant kangaroo is named Jumpa). Ultimately, Diana prevails (usually after one last contest to deflect bullets) and is reluctantly named champion by her mother.
The inspiration to give Diana bracelets came from the pair of bracelets worn by Olive Byrne, creator William Moulton Marston's research assistant and lover.[5] "Wonder Woman and her sister Amazons have to wear heavy bracelets to remind them of what happens to a girl when she lets a man conquer her," quoted Marston in a 1942 interview. "The Amazons once surrendered to the charm of some handsom Greeks and what a mess they got themselves into. The Greeks put them in chains of the Hitler type, beat them, and made them work like horses in the fields. Aphrodite, goddess of love, finally freed these unhappy girls. But she laid down the rule ("Aphrodite's Law") that they must never surrender to a man for any reason. I know of no better advice to give modern day women than this rule that Aphrodite gave the Amazon girls."[206]
As one of the longest continually published comic book characters, Wonder Woman’s history has undergone some changes over the years, though a few elements remain consistent in all of her depictions. She is the princess of the Amazons, a race of women who live free of men on Paradise Island (later dubbed Themyscira). After growing up on this island, Wonder Woman (whom her mother named Diana) journeys to Man’s World on a mission of diplomacy, peace, and love.
The Diana Prince alias also played an important role after the events of Infinite Crisis. Wonder Woman was broadcast worldwide killing a villain named Maxwell Lord, as he was mind controlling Superman into killing Batman. When Wonder Woman caught him in her lasso, demanding to know how to stop Superman, Maxwell revealed that the only way to stop him was to kill Lord, so as a last resort Diana snapped his neck.[63][64] To recover from the trauma of killing another person, the Amazon went into a self-imposed exile for one year.[65] On her return to public life, Diana realized that her life as a full-time celebrity superhero and ambassador had kept her removed from humanity. Because of this she assumed the persona of Diana Prince and became an agent at the Department of Metahuman Affairs. During a later battle with the witch Circe, a spell was placed on Diana leaving her powerless when not in the guise of Wonder Woman.[66]
Writer Eric Luke next joined the comic and depicted Diana as often questioning her mission in Man's World, and most primarily her reason for existing. His most memorable contributions to the title was having Diana separate herself from humanity by residing in a floating palace called the Wonder Dome, and for a godly battle between the Titan Cronus and the various religious pantheons of the world. Phil Jimenez, worked on the title beginning with issue #164 (January 2001),[42] and produced a run which has been likened to Pérez's, particularly since his art bears a resemblance to Pérez's. Jimenez's run showed Wonder Woman as a diplomat, scientist, and activist who worked to help women across the globe become more self-sufficient. Jimenez also added many visual elements found in the Wonder Woman television series. One of Jimenez's story arcs is "The Witch and the Warrior", in which Circe turns New York City's men into beasts, women against men, and lovers against lovers.[43][44][45]
In 1972, just months after the groundbreaking US Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade, science fiction author Samuel R. Delany had planned a story for Ms. that culminated in a plainsclothes Wonder Woman protecting an abortion clinic. However, Steinem disapproved of Wonder Woman being out of costume, and the controversial story line never happened.[222]
As early as the 1950s,[210] Wonder Woman's tiara has also been used as a razor-edged throwing weapon, returning to her like a boomerang.[183] The tiara allows Wonder Woman to be invulnerable from telepathic attacks, as well as allowing her to telepathically contact people such as the Amazons back on Themyscira using the power of the red star ruby in its center.[63]

The I Ching era had an influence on the 1974 Wonder Woman TV movie featuring Cathy Lee Crosby, in which Wonder Woman was portrayed as a non-superpowered globe-trotting super-spy who wore an amalgam of the Wonder Woman and Diana Prince costumes. The first two issues of Allan Heinberg's run (Wonder Woman vol. 3, #1–2) include direct references to I Ching, and feature Diana wearing an outfit similar to that which she wore during the I Ching era.[9]
^ Cronin, Brian. "Diana Prince – Forgotten Classic". Snark Free Waters. Archived from the original on August 10, 2014. Retrieved April 23, 2005. Sadly, though, in the last issue of the run, I-Ching was murdered and Wonder Woman was given amnesia. When the Amazons returned her memories (and her powers), they left out her memories of her experiences as just plain "Diana Prince."
The "Year One" storyline retells Diana's origin growing up on Themyscira. She lives an idyllic life and harbors interest for the outside world, and the first connection to it comes in the form of Steve Trevor, who crashes on the island and is the sole survivor. A contest is held to determine which Amazon is the best candidate to take Steve home, with Diana volunteering despite knowing the cost to leave the island is to never return. Diana wins the contest and departs with Steve. Once arriving in America, Diana is taken into custody by the government to discern her origins. She meets Etta Candy and Barbara Ann Minerva along the way. While incarcerated Diana is visited by the gods in animal form and bestow upon her powers of strength, speed, agility, durability, and flight. She discovers Ares, the god of war, is working to destroy humanity. Accepting her new role in Man's World, Diana, with the help of the gods in animal form, subdues Ares with the lasso. Now called Wonder Woman, Diana becomes one of the world's greatest heroes.
When DC rebooted its entire line in 2011, Diana’s provenance was changed. In the “New 52” continuity, the child is the biological daughter of Zeus and Hippolyta and imbued with all the powers of a demigod, including super strength, speed, and the ability to fly. In this version, Diana grew up believing she was created from clay, but this turns out to be a cover story that Hippolyta concocted to hide the truth.

The Gods, led by Athena, create the Amazons in Greece to realize their ideals and bring humans into following them. The leader of the Amazons, Hippolyta feels a yearning for a child). She makes a clay form of a child and prays to the Gods. Hearing this the Gods give the clay form, transforming it into a live child blessed with Gaea's gift, life. The Gods grant her various abilities and she grows up as Diana of Themyscira.
Wonder Woman had its world premiere on May 15, 2017, in Shanghai. It premiered on May 25, 2017, in Los Angeles.[146] The film's London premiere, which was scheduled to take place on May 31 at the Odeon Leicester Square, was cancelled due to the 2017 Manchester Arena bombing.[147] The film had its Latin America premiere in Mexico City on May 27. It was released in most of the world, including in IMAX,[148] on June 2, 2017, after originally being scheduled for June 23.[149][150] Belgium, Singapore and South Korea received the film first, with May 31 openings.[151][152][153] On April 17, it was announced that Wonder Woman would be released in China on June 2, the same day as its North American release.[154]
Wonder Woman was minorly associated with the series 52, and in the One Year Later universe following Infinite Crisis she becomes a member of the Department of Metahuman Affairs. The most memorable story arc from this era was the much maligned Amazons Attack story arc, which many fans felt was not engaging nor did it do enough service to the well-established characters. After Gail Simone took over the series, a number of memorable story arcs took place, foremost among them Rise of the Olympian and Warkiller. Following the departure of Gail Simone the character was relaunched into the storyline Odyssey, where she must discover who she is and what has happened to her life. During this period she also took part in the events of Blackest Night where she was first a Black Lantern and later a Star Sapphire.

One of the events that led to Infinite Crisis was of Wonder Woman killing the villain Maxwell Lord in Wonder Woman (vol. 2) #219.[114] Maxwell Lord was mind-controlling Superman, who as a result was near to killing Batman. Wonder Woman tried to stop Superman, Lord (who was unable to mind control her) made Superman see her as his enemy Doomsday trying to kill Lois Lane. Superman then attacked Wonder Woman, and a vicious battle ensued. Buying herself time by slicing Superman's throat with her tiara, Wonder Woman caught Lord in her Lasso of Truth and demanded to know how to stop his control over Superman. As the lasso forced the wearer to speak only the truth, Lord told her that the only way to stop him was to kill him. Left with no choice, Wonder Woman snapped Lord's neck and ended his control over Superman.[114] Unknown to her, the entire scene was broadcast live around every channel in the world by Brother Eye. The viewers were not aware of the entire situation, and saw only Wonder Woman murdering a Justice League associate. Wonder Woman's actions put her at odds with Batman and Superman, as they saw Wonder Woman as a cold-blooded killer, despite the fact that she saved their lives.[115]


The Golden, Silver, and Bronze Age portrayals of Wonder Woman showed her using a silent and invisible plane that could be controlled by mental command[211] and fly at speeds up to 3,000 mph (4,800 km/h).[212] Its appearance has varied over time; originally it had a propeller, while later it was drawn as a jet aircraft resembling a stealth aircraft.[213]
Voiced by Roasrio Dawson.,Wonder Woman makes an appearance in Justice League Throne of Atlantis. A story based on Geoff Johns’ Throne of Atlantis. The movie came out in January, 2015. In this film, she first starts out in Athens, Greece, meeting Superman. They passionately kiss and are later seen eating at a cafe, in civilain guise. They bump into Lois Lane and after a small conversation, are spotted by Shazam and Cyborg, taking them away from their date on the grounds that the League needs a meeting.
Steve Rose in The Guardian criticized the film for failing to explore the material's potential for "patriarchy-upending subversion".[223] Peter Travers of Rolling Stone criticized the film's over-reliance on exposition: "Wonder Woman is hobbled by a slogging origin story and action that only comes in fits and starts. Just when Gadot and director Patty Jenkins...are ready to kick ass, we get backstory."[224]

Although created to be a positive role-model and a strong female character for girls and boys,[216] Wonder Woman has had to deal with the misogyny that was commonplace in comic book industry for decades. For example, Wonder Woman was a founding member of the Justice Society of America. This roster included the original Flash and Green Lantern. Wonder Woman was an experienced leader and easily the most powerful of them all, yet was rendered a secretary. This would also be accompanied with her losing her powers or getting captured on most Justice League adventures. During the '50s and '60s, comic writers regularly made Wonder Woman lovesick over Steve Trevor, a Major in the United States Army. Stories frequently featured Wonder Woman hoping or imagining what it would be like to marry Steve Trevor.

After Crisis on Infinite Earths, the character’s origin was slightly retold by Greg Potter and George Perez. In this version, the Amazons were reincarnations of the souls of abused and murdered women from ancient days. In 1200 B.C. a debate occurred on Mount Olympus on how mankind should be made to relate to the gods. Ares, the god of war and destruction, wanted to descend upon the world with his army and crush mankind submission. This was opposed by the others gods present including Artemis, who wanted peace and suggested creating a new race that would lead humans on the right path. Zeus rejected their arguments, and they decided to proceed without his blessing. With the aid of Charon the ferryman, the gods reached the Womb of Gaea, where the souls of women who were abused and murdered at the hands of men were preserved by Gaea herself. Artemis then sent the souls to Greece where they reincarnated into adult women. Aphrodite observed that one soul still remains in the Womb, to which Athena replied that the time had not yet come for that one. The new race in Greece were approached by the goddesses, who bestowed upon them several blessings, charging them with the purpose of leading humanity in the ways of Gaea. They then appointed Hippolyte and Antiope as co-rulers. The civilization is named the Amazons. Stories of this civilization spread throughout Greece and reached the ears of Heracles, who was being manipulated by Ares into attacking the Amazons. Heracles approached the Amazons but was defeated by Hippolyte, upon which he pretended friendship and declared the Amazons allies. When their guard was down, the Greeks drugged the Amazons, taking Hippolyte, Antiope and the other survivors captive. In her cell, Hippolyte is freed by Athena ,who reminds her of her purpose and asked her to avoid revenge and pursue peaceful means. Hippolyte escaped and freed the rest of the Amazons. She shared Athena's message to the Amazons, but blinded by their thirst for revenge, they ruthlessly slaughter the remaining men. Antiope gave Hippolyta her girdle and left to pursue revenge The goddesses appeared and told them they had failed in their purpose and banished them to an island to guard the terrible evil within, as penance. They were granted immortality as long as they did not stray from their new purpose, which would eventually purify their souls. The Amazons built a nation and lived there for 4,000 years. It is during this time that Hippolyte, sole leader of the Amazons, felt an unexplained yearning. Menalippe, the Oracle, told her she was the only Amazon pregnant at the time of her previous incarnation's death, and thus the yearning she felt was the call of her unborn child. As per her advise, Hippolyte went to the shore at sunrise and made a clay figure of a baby. She then cried out to Artemis. The gods, recognizing it was time for the remaining soul in Gaea's womb to depart, infused it into the clay form, which then incarnated as a real child. Blessed with Gaea's greatest gift, life, the gods present bestowed their gifts upon the newborn: Demeter granted the baby great strength, Aphrodite granted her great beauty and a loving heart, Athena granted her great wisdom, Artemis granted her the eye of the hunter and unity with beasts, Hestia granted her sisterhood with fire, and Hermes gave her great speed and the power of flight. Hippolyte named her after a holy warrior, Diana, and she grew up knowing the love of a thousand mothers. Thus Diana of Themyscira was born.
Wonder Woman’s costume has come under heavy criticism throughout the years. Many find that as an example of a character that is supposed to represent female empowerment that by wearing a costume which reveals a gratuitous amount of skin that the character is being contradictory. Numerous attempts have been made to make her costume more realistic, however in terms of the character’s history there are few problems with it. Despite that it offers little protection, Wonder Woman does not require very much protection, either from harm or from the elements. The costume is also sometimes criticized for its symbolism closely related to American themes, that despite the fact that she is meant to be an emissary of peace to the whole planet, that her costume looks very American This is explained as one of the motivations for her role in Man’s World world. The costume is a breastplate inspired by the colors and symbols of a downed World War II airplane being flown by Steve Trevor’s mother . As an American pilot, it is therefore not surprising that stars (on the lower part of her breastplate) and stripes (one her boots) are evident parts of the design. In the summer of 2011 it was announced that DC Comics would reboot its entire lineup and create the new 52. Debate immediately surfaced as the head creative force behind the reboot (Jim Lee) decided that all female characters should be drawn with "pants" or full leg covering as part of their costume. This was in line with the redrawn Wonder Woman after issue #600 in volume 3. However, as the summer progressed images began to appear with Diana in a costume which appeared to be a synthesis of her traditional one and the reimagined one. With the actual reboot this is the costume that was decided on, essentially with the breastplate in the general shape of the traditional costume, and the theme being more in line with the redesign of the previous year. She additionally has added aspects of her uniform which didn't exist before such as a braided armband.

The American theme of Diana's costume was explained by Pérez in the Challenge of the Gods storyline in which Diana engaged in a series of trials arranged by Zeus as punishment for refusing his advances. Diana met the spirit of Steve Trevor's mother, Diana Trevor, who was clad in armor identical to her own. Trevor revealed that during World War II she had crashed on Themyscira while on duty as a U.S. Army pilot. She blundered into an Amazon battle against Cottus, a multi-armed demon, at the portal to the underworld. Trevor was drawn into the battle, although she was armed only with her side arm. She wounded the beast before suffering a mortal blow, allowing the Amazons to reseal the portal.[37]
Duing the Perez run on the character, there were not as many story arcs either, but they did become more defined. Her entrance into Man’s World was to stop a global nuclear war created by Ares. She also had introduced a modern version of the Cheetah, Circe, Doctor Psycho and Silver Swan. One of the defining story arcs at this time was the Challenge of the Gods, where she discovers the truth about her own past as she journeys into the underworld. In this time as well she was a part of numerous company-wide crossovers including Millennium, Invasion and one focused on herself, the War of the Gods. The latter was Perez’s swansong on the character and with Messner Loebs taking over afterwards the direction of the character changed again somewhat. Under his direction, Diana became involved in battle factions of organized crime in Boston, and faced off against Ares Buchanan and the White Magician. This resulted in Wonder Woman being marooned in space, and returning to uncover the plot. During the events of Zero Hour a slightly different version of her origin is told, and Artemis wins the right to be Wonder Woman in another contest. This ends eventually with Diana battling the White Magician after Artemis has been killed. The John Byrne run equally was without as many defined story arcs except specifically with how her death affected others. This was also incorporated into the company wide Genesis event. Once she returned she faced a new villain known as Devastation who she battled occasionally, and she also took responsibility for Cassandra Sandsmark (who would later become Wonder Girl.) As a prominent character within the DC universe she took part in company-wide crossovers like Our Worlds at War and the Joker’s Last Laugh. When Rucka took over, some of the character's most memorable story arcs occurred, and most famously among them Stoned and the Superman story arc Sacrifice which ended in Wonder Woman #219 with her killing Maxwell Lord.
Pallas Athena, the goddess of wisdom and war, granted Diana great wisdom, intelligence, and military prowess. Athena's gift has enabled Diana to master over a dozen languages (including those of alien origin), multiple complex crafts, sciences and philosophies, as well as leadership, military strategy, and armed and unarmed combat. More recently, Athena bound her own eyesight to Diana's, granting her increased empathy.[182]

The Lasso of Truth forces people to tell the truth. It was forged by Hephaestus from the Golden Girdle of Gaea that Antiope had once worn. It is able to restore people's lost memories get rid of illusions or cause illusions to those it holds and heal the holder's body cure insanity and protect people who are in close proximity to it from magical attacks. In the golden age version the lasso could also take on a rigid form and hold people aloft from a great distance away. During these eras, the lasso also forced those who were bound by it to act as the holder demanded. This trait also affected Wonder Woman. A non-combat application of the lasso is that it can be used to change Diana's clothes as long as those clothes are "in the right frequency" as the lasso. Although this was a plot device used more often in the golden and silver age in has been used on occasion in modern comics as for instance one time Diana transformed into a Miss America costume. The lasso is essentially indestructible, and can be offensively used in combat to incapacitate, and even attacking their souls.
After Sekowsky's run ended in the early 1970s, Diana's roots were reverted to her old mythological ones and she wore a more modernized version of her original outfit, a predecessor to her "bathing suit" outfit.[194] Later, in 1976, her glowing white belt was turned into a yellow one.[194] For Series 3, artist Terry Dodson redrew her outfit as a strapless swimsuit.[195]
The costs for television advertisements for Wonder Woman are higher in comparison to that of previous DCEU film Suicide Squad. Warner Bros. has spent over $3 million on advertisements for Wonder Woman, whereas they spent $2.6 million on advertisements for Suicide Squad.[157] Ticket selling site Fandango reported that Wonder Woman rounded the final leg of its marketing campaign as the most anticipated blockbuster of summer 2017, according to a poll conducted by 10,000 voters, the biggest survey in company history.[158] Separately, Fandango also found that 92% of people surveyed said that they are looking forward to seeing a film that features a standalone woman superhero, and 87% wished Hollywood would make more women-led superhero films.[159] In May 2017, NASCAR driver Danica Patrick drove her No. 10 car with a Wonder Woman paint scheme at the Go Bowling 400 in Kansas and at the Monster Energy Open in Charlotte.[160]

After Crisis on Infinite Earths, George Pérez rebooted the character in 1987. She wore an outfit similar to her 1970s one, but now with a larger glowing golden belt.[194] This outfit continued until William Messner-Loebs' run, which had Diana pass on the role of Wonder Woman to Artemis.[194] No longer Wonder Woman, Diana sported a new black biker-girl outfit designed by artist Mike Deodato Jr.[194] After John Byrne took over writing and art duties, he redesigned the Wonder Woman outfit (Diana was reinstated as Wonder Woman at the end of Loebs' run) and joined the emblem and belt together.[194]
After Sekowsky's run ended in the early 1970s, Diana's roots were reverted to her old mythological ones and she wore a more modernized version of her original outfit, a predecessor to her "bathing suit" outfit.[194] Later, in 1976, her glowing white belt was turned into a yellow one.[194] For Series 3, artist Terry Dodson redrew her outfit as a strapless swimsuit.[195]

^ Garcia, Joe. "The Best & Worst of DC Comics' New 52, One Year Later". Front Towards Gamer. Archived from the original on September 10, 2012. Retrieved September 5, 2012. Despite being one part of the Justice League's "Holy Trinity", Wonder Woman never seems to get the recognition that she deserves. While she might not be invincible, her strength is second only to Superman and she's arguably a better fighter. Her solo outings, however, were rarely very interesting. The New 52 put an end to that injustice, with Brian Azzarello and Cliff Chiang spearheading one of the best books DC is putting out. Azzarello currently has Wonder Woman tearing through the ranks of Greek mythology, and Chiang's art manages to be intense despite his use of softer lines. If you're not reading Wonder Woman, go rectify that.
A few weeks later in September, Cameron reiterated his criticism in an interview with The Hollywood Reporter. He compared Gal Gadot's representation of the character to Raquel Welch films of the 1960s,[263] and reinforced a comparison with Linda Hamilton's portrayal of Sarah Connor. He argued that Connor was "if not ahead of its time, at least a breakthrough in its time" because though she "looked great", she "wasn't treated as a sex object".[263] He also stated that he while he "applaud[s] Patty directing the film and Hollywood, uh, 'letting' a woman direct a major action franchise, I didn't think there was anything groundbreaking in Wonder Woman. I thought it was a good film. Period."[263] Former Wonder Woman actress Lynda Carter responded to Cameron's The Hollywood Reporter interview by asking him to "Stop dissing WW." Like Jenkins, she suggests that while Cameron does "not understand the character", she does. She also refers to Cameron's critiques as "thuggish jabs at a brilliant director" that are as "ill advised" as the "movie was spot on." Carter also states that she has the authority to make these observations because she has "embodied this character for more than 40 years".[264][265][266] A month later, Jenkins responded to Cameron's comments once again in an interview with Variety, stating that she "was not upset at all", as "everybody is entitled to their own opinion. But if you're going to debate something in a public way, I have to reply that I think it's incorrect."[267] Tricia Ennis was also critical of Cameron's statements, arguing that "while he may consider himself a feminist and an ally to women, [he] is not very good at it" as being an ally means using his position of privilege "without silencing the voices of those you're trying to help". She also states that it "is not enough to simply call yourself a feminist. It's not even enough to create a strong female character ... You have to bring women to the table. You have to let them speak. You cannot speak for them. But speaking for women is exactly what Cameron is doing through his comments ... Cameron is using his position of power as a respected producer and director to silence women."[268]
When faced with a larger threat, Diana will wear her Amazon battle armour for added protection as well as use martial weapons such as swords. Technically speaking as well, as reimagined under the George Perez 1980s reboot, the iconic costume is in fact simply the breastplate of this armour. She will also additionally use a shield for added defense when she deems it necessary.
Development for a live action Wonder Woman feature film began in 1996, with Ivan Reitman attached as producer and possible director.[66] In 1999 the project became attached to Jon Cohen, who adapted Wonder Woman for producer Joel Silver, with the hope that Sandra Bullock would star.[67] By 2001, Todd Alcott was hired to write the screenplay, with Silver Pictures backing the project.[68] At that time, performers such as Mariah Carey and Catherine Zeta-Jones were also rumored to be possible candidates for the role of Wonder Woman.[69] Leonard Goldberg focused on Bullock[70] who said that she was approached for the role. Lucy Lawless, the star of Xena: Warrior Princess, was also under consideration, though she stated that she would have been more interested if Wonder Woman was portrayed as a "flawed hero".[71] The screenplay went through various drafts written by Alcott, Cohen, Becky Johnston, and Philip Levens,[72] and by August 2003, Levens had been replaced by screenwriter Laeta Kalogridis.[73]
Before I start with my thoughts on this and everything surrounding, let me just say that, FINALLY, the DC Extended Universe gets one right with this movie. You don't know how long I've been waiting to say those words. Though, to be fair, after The Dark Knight Trilogy (THE best superhero trilogy bar none), I haven't kept up with any of DC's efforts to create its own massive universe. I find Superman to be interminably boring, so I had no interest (outside of Michael Shannon) in seeing Man of Steel. DC, in my opinion, made the wrong choice to keep Batman dark and brooding after The Dark Knight Trilogy so, again, I had no real interest in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice outside of maybe seeing Wonder Woman. DC has done a poor job at building its own extended universe so, once again, I had no interest in the Justice League movie. You see how it is. Of the movies in this universe, the only one I've seen was Suicide Squad, which, while decent, wasn't good and squandered its potential. Wonder Woman was the only shining beacon of hope in the horizon, the chance to (finally) do a female superhero movie right. Elektra and Catwoman both sucked and Marvel, since their ascent, wasted their chance to be first in this race by not doing a Black Widow movie. Here's the thing though, before I get to Wonder Woman, and I've mentioned this a lot, but DC Comics is essentially playing catch-up with Marvel. That's why you see them bumbling and fumbling major movies, because they know they have to catch up, since Marvel has, pretty much had a monopoly on this superhero movie business since Iron Man came out in 2008. The thing about Marvel is that they knew they couldn't rush things, they had to slowly plant the seeds for something bigger and, now, you see that that patience has paid off immensely. I don't know how much money the MCU has raked in for Disney (and this is counting merchandising, DVD sales and other forms of revenue), but it has to be a multi-billion dollar franchise for Disney. DC hasn't had the same patience, as they're following the same template without understanding why it worked in the first place. It can't be all at once, it has to be done little by little. Rome wasn't built in a day and DC has attempted to build Rome (with its extended universe) in 20 minutes. But, at the same time, DC wasn't always a point of mockery. DC characters were the first to make the transition from comic to successful major motion pictures with Superman (in 1978) and Batman (in 1989). Marvel was playing catch-up to DC in the era following Batman's successful release. They released some truly awful movies in the 90s, like Captain America in 1990 and The Fantastic Four in 94, which was so bad that it hasn't been released yet. There may have been others, but those are the major ones that pop to mind. So, in DC's defense, they can still make something of their universe. But, and to me this is most important, the whole thing needs to not be so dark and serious. Marvel has succeeded in large part because they know how to pace their movies. They know that you need comedy in movies like this. It can't be all darkness and brooding characters struggling with their own moral dilemmas about what is right and what is wrong. The whole look of the films also needs some more life injected into them. Marvel movies are diverse in settings and cinematography, so, in spite of being set in the same universe, the MCU films feel different tonally and visually. In the DC, every movie sort of looks the same. With a dark, grey and blue hue. And, as great as this movie is, once they get to London, it's really more of the same in terms of visuals. Having said all of that, let's move on shall we? I'm honestly quite surprised that DC waited THIS long to make a Wonder Woman movie, particularly when, to me, this is the movie that should have started your whole extended universe. This should have been the starting point for all things DCEU. Firstly, if we're doing this in chronological order so, technically, this should have been first and, secondly, it's a great movie, so you start off with this and people would actually be pumped for the DCEU instead of looking at things so cynically now. Because as things are now, Wonder Woman feels like the exception to the rule that DCEU movies aren't exactly good. It's an asterisk. And that's not to minimize this film's significance, because I do like the shift and I feel that DC knows that, at least for this moment in time, Wonder Woman is its most important character. People have seen Superman and they've seen Batman and that's not to say that they're tired of the same shit, because there's still many fanboys/girls out there, but I think people want something that's new in that universe and Wonder Woman provides that for people. So that's why, in my opinion, DC needs to worry far more about Wonder Woman, as she needs to be their top priority, for your cinematic universe going forward as opposed to the old, familiar faces. Having said that, let's get going, shall we? I think first I need to talk about Gal Gadot's casting as Wonder Woman. At first, honestly, I didn't get it. Don't get me wrong, Gal Gadot is a very talented and attractive woman, but I just didn't get IT for the longest time. But, having finally seen her as this character, I understand the decision to cast her in the role. Firstly, for some reason or another, she's even more stunningly beautiful as Wonder Woman than even I imagined. Plus, honestly, I find she brings all the values to the character that she needs. So, in my opinion, it's a good combination of both. Diana Prince (Wonder Woman) herself comes from a long line of Amazonian warrior women created by Zeus in order to protect mankind, really, from itself. Ares, the god of war, being tots jelly of humanity, decided to plot its destruction by influencing them and his influence leading to the humans starting wars against each other. Ares has also killed all of the gods with the exception of Zeus himself. Zeus used the last of his power to wound Ares and making him retreat. Long story short, Zeus essentially hid Themyscira (the island the Amazons live in) to keep from Ares from finding it and left them a weapon called the Godkiller for Ares' return. Blah, blah, blah, long story short, Steve Trevor (an Allied spy) crashes his plane off the coast of Themyscira, wherein German soldiers follow him and there, they fight against the Amazonian women who, after losing some of their own, including Diana's aunt, defeat the German soldiers. Steve, after telling them about the Great War (WWI) attempts to enlist the help of the Amazonian women in order to turn the tide of war, but Hippolyta (Diana's mother) has none of it. Steve has found this notebook by this German doctor that tells of an attempt to create a deadlier form of mustard gas, which he's trying to put a stop to or else millions more will die. Diana, being incredibly idealistic, figures that this is Ares' return to the world of men and she needs to put a stop to it by killing Ares. Diana eventually does leave with Steve, she'll never be able to return to Themyscira again as a result. So, eventually, Steve and Diana make their way to London, where they begin their plan to fight back against the Germans (pre-Hitler) and attempt to put a stop to this deadlier mustard gas. I will say that the movie does miss a chance to tell an incredibly interesting story of Diana having to adjust to the gender differences once she makes it to London. Women aren't allowed in the military, they're not even allowed in this war council to discuss an armistice between them and the Germans. Diana, of course, finds her way in this meeting and she browbeats one of the generals for being a coward, acting as if the lives of his soldiers are less important than his own and not fighting alongside his men. Women, at least in this point in time, have not been allowed the vote either. And, honestly, it would have been incredibly interesting to explore that dynamic of Diana, coming from an island where women are clearly superior in every way (even though there's no men) to a place where women are so clearly oppressed. There's a few hints of it here and there, but I think the movie would have benefited from exploring that dynamic a little bit more, in my opinion. One of the things I liked about this movie is that, unlike a lot of superhero movies, I do think they try to give a face at the people that are being affected by the war and how that motivates Diana to try and help them, whether it's by driving the German soldiers from this small town or getting rid of Dr. Maru and Ludendorff, the ones not letting this armistice go through and who are also developing the deadlier mustard gas. There's an interesting debate here that, honestly, I wish the movie would have stuck with. There comes a point, much later in the film where Diana kills Ludendorff, as has been her goal all along, since she feels Ludendorff is Ares and killing him stops the fighting. She does, in fact, kill Ludendorf, but the fighting does not stop. In fact, you could argue, that it gets worse. Diana questions Steve about why the fighting hasn't stopped and there's a discussion between the two where Steve says that, maybe, just maybe that's just how we are, we're (hard)wired to self-destruct. There's just something to the idea that Diana believes that only one person is to blame for all of this and by stopping that one person stops the war itself. It's an interesting idea because it brings to mind the questions that, really, maybe we're not really worth saving in some way, if all we do is keep killing each other every few years. Not many superhero movies deal with this topic in this way. But, of course, you could say that it's a bit of a red herring given that, in fact, Ludendorff was not Ares and, instead, was someone they considered an ally. But it's interesting to explore regardless, given that Diana is still so naive about certain things in 'modern' times and how her idealistic values and ideas aren't shared by everyone around her. I think that's probably one of the best thing this movie does, just sort of explore the idea that not everyone shares Diana's values and how, in a way, her views are sort either antiquated, ahead of their time or both. Steve, who's been helpful to her every step of the way, does stand in her way in some scenes before, of course, Diana takes matter into her own hands. Diana and Steve's relationship is also one of the strongest points of the movies. This is in large part, of course, to how great Gal Gadot and Chris Pine are, their chemistry is excellent and, while the movie does contain a romantic angle between the two, it doesn't feel forced or unnatural. As I mention, Gal Gadot's performance is very strong. She's a badass, but she also brings heart and life to the character. She's not necessarily a goody two-shoes like Captain America, but they share some similarities in how they view the world. You can see how people would be drawn to her kind and compassionate nature and that's not something that, say, a lot of actors playing superheroes are able to capture. The film does have a good bit of action and it is pretty damn good all things considered. There were some parts that I felt were too Zak Snyder-y, like the whole slo-mo things that Zak Snyder abused in 300. But, at the very least, in this case, it can be explained by the fact that one of Diana's superpowers is seeing bullets in slo-mo, which allows her to deflect them before they harm her or anybody. So, at least, it's not a stylistic choice that was abused, it has actual significance. The action gets a thumbs up from me as if that wasn't obvious. So you know how I mentioned earlier that the movie touches on the fact that, maybe, humanity isn't worth saving if all we are is doomed to destroy ourselves. Well, later on in the movie, Diana comes to the realization that, in spite of everything, humanity is worth fighting for. One of the things I didn't like, there's actually a couple of minor issues I had, is the fact that the whole ending of Diana saying that she believes love will end up saving us is really kind of corny and cheesy. Not that the message isn't a worthy one, it's just how it's handled. And, really, Steve's ultimate act of sacrifice was one made for love, so it makes sense that Diana would believe that, it's execution is still a bit corny. Another thing that bothered me is that, ultimately, the fighting DID stop after Diana killed Ares and, I don't know, I feel like that's too simplistic of a conclusion for something as complex as the first World War. I like the earlier themes which, while certainly more bleak (and that's something DCEU could do to remove from its movies), it's still a better conclusion and, at the same time, Diana can still come to the same conclusion she did as a result of Steve's actions. Minor issues, really, as it didn't really affect my overall enjoyment of the film. Having said that, do I think that this is one of the best superhero movies ever made? No, not really. It's the best movie based on one of DC's properties since the Dark Knight Trilogy finished off in 2012. It's a great superhero movie, with a strong origin story at its core, great performances from Gal Gadot and Chris Pine and a more humanistic approach to its conflict, in that the people Diana and Steve are trying to save aren't entirely faceless as they usually are in these movies (even in the MCU). But, at the same time, there's nothing really about this movie that extends the boundaries of what we know the superhero genre to be. It works solely within that framework. And there's nothing wrong with that but, to me, the best superhero movies transcend their framework to become something more, something fresh within this genre and, honestly, I don't think this offered anything fresh. Maybe that's just me. Regardless of all of that, this is still a great superhero movie and, as mentioned, this should have been DC's first step in their attempts to create their own cinematic universe. As such, we cannot turn back time and, as I mentioned earlier, Wonder Woman should be DC's top priority right now. Wonder Woman needs to be the centerpiece of their extended universe if they want to come close to rivaling Marvel. Or even just being a strong number 2. They're number 2 by default, but they're not a strong number 2. With that said, this is a great start to this franchise and I'm eagerly looking forward to more from this character and how DC decides to expand the character. I would easily recommend this.
The show is always bordering on the level of high camp, but like most every show from the 1970s, it tells its' story in a very plain straightforward fashion. Wonder Woman comes to the aid of Steve Trevor, who can never seem to help himself (the male in distress). Someone they know turns out to be an undercover Nazi spy, who is trying to steal valuable information or hurt many Americans.
Aphrodite, in particular, plays a large role in numerous comic book runs. Diana’s love for Steve Trevor is, in fact, forbidden by the goddess. According to Aphrodite, if Diana falls in love with a man, she is at risk of losing her powers. Over the course of over seven decades, there are several issues of Wonder Woman comics that depict the heroine without her powers, but, due to the comics' relative lack of popularity, they were quickly forgotten.
It was the fall of 1985...I walked into editor Janice Race's office to find out about the fate of Diana Prince. I was curious to learn who was going to draw her. Superman had [John] Byrne and [Jerry] Ordway, Batman had [Frank] Miller and [Alan] Davis (and later [David] Mazzucchelli). Wonder Woman had...No one. A writer, Greg Potter, had been selected but no established artist wanted to handle the new series. After exhaustive searches, it seemed Wonder Woman would have to be assigned to an unknown...I thought of John Byrne and Superman. What a giant coup for DC. A top talent and fan-fave on their premier character..."Janice" I heard myself say "What if I took on Wonder Woman for the first six months – just to get her out of the starting gate?"
After taking on the mantle God of War after killing her mentor War. Diana have shown some new abilities. She can now telepathically communicate and control all soldiers on the planet since she is their greatest leader. She hasn't shown the ability, but as her predecessor was able to bring back dead soldiers to fight alongside him, she might be able to do so as well.

A sharpshooter and ally of Steve Trevor.[48] On his role, Bremner said, "I play a character who's enlisted by Wonder Woman to help save the world as part of a small, unlikely band". Describing his character, Bremner stated "He's a shellshocked soldier who's been discharged from the war and is brought back to help on a secret mission".[50] On working with Jenkins, Bremner commented, "Patty Jenkins is a force of nature. She has fantastic vision, strength and enthusiasm, which is completely infectious and motivates a cast and crew of thousands to really go beyond themselves."[51]
During the Silver Age, under writer Robert Kanigher, Wonder Woman's origin was revamped,[33] along with other characters'. The new origin story increased the character's Hellenic and mythological roots: receiving the blessing of each deity in her crib, Diana is destined to become as "beautiful as Aphrodite, wise as Athena, strong as Hercules, and swift as Hermes."[34]
Due to the reboot of the character following Crisis on Infinite Earths, numerous things no longer made sense in terms of continuity as it related to the remainder of the DC Universe. As her first overall appearance was now in continuity around the Legends miniseries, it no longer made sense that she was a founding member of the Justice League of America. This founding position was instead given retroactively to Black Canary. Later it was decided that she should be given this position back and thus both she and Black Canary were considered founding members of the Justice League. In reference to the Justice League though, although she has more than 400 combined appearances therein, she has had most of her character development in her own series.
As Diana’s half-brother, Ares (also known as Mars in various comic  runs) is often referred to as Wonder Woman’s archenemy. As his origins have switched several times from Greek to Roman mythology and back, different authors have penned him in several different lights, but always with similar features. For example, Ares has almost always opposed the Amazons as well as the goddess Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love.
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