On occasions Wonder Woman has employed a magical sword of unknown (though presumably Amazon) origin. This sword has been used most specifically against those with the power of invulnerability as invulnerability generally does not work against magical items. It is generally represented as a short sword. In Wonder Woman (vol. 4) #15, Hephaestus modifies Diana's bracelets so that she can manifest two short swords from them during battle.


First, in 1942, Princess Maru, also known as Dr. Poison, was depicted as a chief scientist of the Nazi Poison Division. She later became Russian in the New 52 comic book run, and in DC Rebirth, she is known as Colonel Marina Maru, a Japanese soldier working for an organization known only as Poison – an organization founded by her family. In the live-action film, however, Dr. Isabel Maru is a Spanish scientist hired by the Germans to develop chemical weapons during World War I.
Never prone to stewing in solitude, and taking more notes from Richard Donner than from Christopher Nolan, Patty Jenkins' Wonder Woman provides a welcome respite from DC's house style of grim darkness—boisterous, earnest, sometimes sloppy, yet consistently entertaining—with star Gal Gadot proving an inspired choice for this avatar of truth, justice, and the Amazonian way.[211]
The New 52 version of Earth 2 was introduced in Earth 2 #1 (2012). In that issue, the Earth 2 Wonder Woman is introduced via flashback. She, along with Superman and Batman, are depicted dying in battle with forces from Apokolips five years in the past.[158] This Wonder Woman worshiped the deities of Roman mythology as opposed to the Greek; the Roman gods perish as a result of the conflict. An earlier version of the Earth-2 Wonder Woman, prior to the Apokoliptian invasion, is seen in the comic book Batman/Superman, where she is seen riding a pegasus.

Before I start with my thoughts on this and everything surrounding, let me just say that, FINALLY, the DC Extended Universe gets one right with this movie. You don't know how long I've been waiting to say those words. Though, to be fair, after The Dark Knight Trilogy (THE best superhero trilogy bar none), I haven't kept up with any of DC's efforts to create its own massive universe. I find Superman to be interminably boring, so I had no interest (outside of Michael Shannon) in seeing Man of Steel. DC, in my opinion, made the wrong choice to keep Batman dark and brooding after The Dark Knight Trilogy so, again, I had no real interest in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice outside of maybe seeing Wonder Woman. DC has done a poor job at building its own extended universe so, once again, I had no interest in the Justice League movie. You see how it is. Of the movies in this universe, the only one I've seen was Suicide Squad, which, while decent, wasn't good and squandered its potential. Wonder Woman was the only shining beacon of hope in the horizon, the chance to (finally) do a female superhero movie right. Elektra and Catwoman both sucked and Marvel, since their ascent, wasted their chance to be first in this race by not doing a Black Widow movie. Here's the thing though, before I get to Wonder Woman, and I've mentioned this a lot, but DC Comics is essentially playing catch-up with Marvel. That's why you see them bumbling and fumbling major movies, because they know they have to catch up, since Marvel has, pretty much had a monopoly on this superhero movie business since Iron Man came out in 2008. The thing about Marvel is that they knew they couldn't rush things, they had to slowly plant the seeds for something bigger and, now, you see that that patience has paid off immensely. I don't know how much money the MCU has raked in for Disney (and this is counting merchandising, DVD sales and other forms of revenue), but it has to be a multi-billion dollar franchise for Disney. DC hasn't had the same patience, as they're following the same template without understanding why it worked in the first place. It can't be all at once, it has to be done little by little. Rome wasn't built in a day and DC has attempted to build Rome (with its extended universe) in 20 minutes. But, at the same time, DC wasn't always a point of mockery. DC characters were the first to make the transition from comic to successful major motion pictures with Superman (in 1978) and Batman (in 1989). Marvel was playing catch-up to DC in the era following Batman's successful release. They released some truly awful movies in the 90s, like Captain America in 1990 and The Fantastic Four in 94, which was so bad that it hasn't been released yet. There may have been others, but those are the major ones that pop to mind. So, in DC's defense, they can still make something of their universe. But, and to me this is most important, the whole thing needs to not be so dark and serious. Marvel has succeeded in large part because they know how to pace their movies. They know that you need comedy in movies like this. It can't be all darkness and brooding characters struggling with their own moral dilemmas about what is right and what is wrong. The whole look of the films also needs some more life injected into them. Marvel movies are diverse in settings and cinematography, so, in spite of being set in the same universe, the MCU films feel different tonally and visually. In the DC, every movie sort of looks the same. With a dark, grey and blue hue. And, as great as this movie is, once they get to London, it's really more of the same in terms of visuals. Having said all of that, let's move on shall we? I'm honestly quite surprised that DC waited THIS long to make a Wonder Woman movie, particularly when, to me, this is the movie that should have started your whole extended universe. This should have been the starting point for all things DCEU. Firstly, if we're doing this in chronological order so, technically, this should have been first and, secondly, it's a great movie, so you start off with this and people would actually be pumped for the DCEU instead of looking at things so cynically now. Because as things are now, Wonder Woman feels like the exception to the rule that DCEU movies aren't exactly good. It's an asterisk. And that's not to minimize this film's significance, because I do like the shift and I feel that DC knows that, at least for this moment in time, Wonder Woman is its most important character. People have seen Superman and they've seen Batman and that's not to say that they're tired of the same shit, because there's still many fanboys/girls out there, but I think people want something that's new in that universe and Wonder Woman provides that for people. So that's why, in my opinion, DC needs to worry far more about Wonder Woman, as she needs to be their top priority, for your cinematic universe going forward as opposed to the old, familiar faces. Having said that, let's get going, shall we? I think first I need to talk about Gal Gadot's casting as Wonder Woman. At first, honestly, I didn't get it. Don't get me wrong, Gal Gadot is a very talented and attractive woman, but I just didn't get IT for the longest time. But, having finally seen her as this character, I understand the decision to cast her in the role. Firstly, for some reason or another, she's even more stunningly beautiful as Wonder Woman than even I imagined. Plus, honestly, I find she brings all the values to the character that she needs. So, in my opinion, it's a good combination of both. Diana Prince (Wonder Woman) herself comes from a long line of Amazonian warrior women created by Zeus in order to protect mankind, really, from itself. Ares, the god of war, being tots jelly of humanity, decided to plot its destruction by influencing them and his influence leading to the humans starting wars against each other. Ares has also killed all of the gods with the exception of Zeus himself. Zeus used the last of his power to wound Ares and making him retreat. Long story short, Zeus essentially hid Themyscira (the island the Amazons live in) to keep from Ares from finding it and left them a weapon called the Godkiller for Ares' return. Blah, blah, blah, long story short, Steve Trevor (an Allied spy) crashes his plane off the coast of Themyscira, wherein German soldiers follow him and there, they fight against the Amazonian women who, after losing some of their own, including Diana's aunt, defeat the German soldiers. Steve, after telling them about the Great War (WWI) attempts to enlist the help of the Amazonian women in order to turn the tide of war, but Hippolyta (Diana's mother) has none of it. Steve has found this notebook by this German doctor that tells of an attempt to create a deadlier form of mustard gas, which he's trying to put a stop to or else millions more will die. Diana, being incredibly idealistic, figures that this is Ares' return to the world of men and she needs to put a stop to it by killing Ares. Diana eventually does leave with Steve, she'll never be able to return to Themyscira again as a result. So, eventually, Steve and Diana make their way to London, where they begin their plan to fight back against the Germans (pre-Hitler) and attempt to put a stop to this deadlier mustard gas. I will say that the movie does miss a chance to tell an incredibly interesting story of Diana having to adjust to the gender differences once she makes it to London. Women aren't allowed in the military, they're not even allowed in this war council to discuss an armistice between them and the Germans. Diana, of course, finds her way in this meeting and she browbeats one of the generals for being a coward, acting as if the lives of his soldiers are less important than his own and not fighting alongside his men. Women, at least in this point in time, have not been allowed the vote either. And, honestly, it would have been incredibly interesting to explore that dynamic of Diana, coming from an island where women are clearly superior in every way (even though there's no men) to a place where women are so clearly oppressed. There's a few hints of it here and there, but I think the movie would have benefited from exploring that dynamic a little bit more, in my opinion. One of the things I liked about this movie is that, unlike a lot of superhero movies, I do think they try to give a face at the people that are being affected by the war and how that motivates Diana to try and help them, whether it's by driving the German soldiers from this small town or getting rid of Dr. Maru and Ludendorff, the ones not letting this armistice go through and who are also developing the deadlier mustard gas. There's an interesting debate here that, honestly, I wish the movie would have stuck with. There comes a point, much later in the film where Diana kills Ludendorff, as has been her goal all along, since she feels Ludendorff is Ares and killing him stops the fighting. She does, in fact, kill Ludendorf, but the fighting does not stop. In fact, you could argue, that it gets worse. Diana questions Steve about why the fighting hasn't stopped and there's a discussion between the two where Steve says that, maybe, just maybe that's just how we are, we're (hard)wired to self-destruct. There's just something to the idea that Diana believes that only one person is to blame for all of this and by stopping that one person stops the war itself. It's an interesting idea because it brings to mind the questions that, really, maybe we're not really worth saving in some way, if all we do is keep killing each other every few years. Not many superhero movies deal with this topic in this way. But, of course, you could say that it's a bit of a red herring given that, in fact, Ludendorff was not Ares and, instead, was someone they considered an ally. But it's interesting to explore regardless, given that Diana is still so naive about certain things in 'modern' times and how her idealistic values and ideas aren't shared by everyone around her. I think that's probably one of the best thing this movie does, just sort of explore the idea that not everyone shares Diana's values and how, in a way, her views are sort either antiquated, ahead of their time or both. Steve, who's been helpful to her every step of the way, does stand in her way in some scenes before, of course, Diana takes matter into her own hands. Diana and Steve's relationship is also one of the strongest points of the movies. This is in large part, of course, to how great Gal Gadot and Chris Pine are, their chemistry is excellent and, while the movie does contain a romantic angle between the two, it doesn't feel forced or unnatural. As I mention, Gal Gadot's performance is very strong. She's a badass, but she also brings heart and life to the character. She's not necessarily a goody two-shoes like Captain America, but they share some similarities in how they view the world. You can see how people would be drawn to her kind and compassionate nature and that's not something that, say, a lot of actors playing superheroes are able to capture. The film does have a good bit of action and it is pretty damn good all things considered. There were some parts that I felt were too Zak Snyder-y, like the whole slo-mo things that Zak Snyder abused in 300. But, at the very least, in this case, it can be explained by the fact that one of Diana's superpowers is seeing bullets in slo-mo, which allows her to deflect them before they harm her or anybody. So, at least, it's not a stylistic choice that was abused, it has actual significance. The action gets a thumbs up from me as if that wasn't obvious. So you know how I mentioned earlier that the movie touches on the fact that, maybe, humanity isn't worth saving if all we are is doomed to destroy ourselves. Well, later on in the movie, Diana comes to the realization that, in spite of everything, humanity is worth fighting for. One of the things I didn't like, there's actually a couple of minor issues I had, is the fact that the whole ending of Diana saying that she believes love will end up saving us is really kind of corny and cheesy. Not that the message isn't a worthy one, it's just how it's handled. And, really, Steve's ultimate act of sacrifice was one made for love, so it makes sense that Diana would believe that, it's execution is still a bit corny. Another thing that bothered me is that, ultimately, the fighting DID stop after Diana killed Ares and, I don't know, I feel like that's too simplistic of a conclusion for something as complex as the first World War. I like the earlier themes which, while certainly more bleak (and that's something DCEU could do to remove from its movies), it's still a better conclusion and, at the same time, Diana can still come to the same conclusion she did as a result of Steve's actions. Minor issues, really, as it didn't really affect my overall enjoyment of the film. Having said that, do I think that this is one of the best superhero movies ever made? No, not really. It's the best movie based on one of DC's properties since the Dark Knight Trilogy finished off in 2012. It's a great superhero movie, with a strong origin story at its core, great performances from Gal Gadot and Chris Pine and a more humanistic approach to its conflict, in that the people Diana and Steve are trying to save aren't entirely faceless as they usually are in these movies (even in the MCU). But, at the same time, there's nothing really about this movie that extends the boundaries of what we know the superhero genre to be. It works solely within that framework. And there's nothing wrong with that but, to me, the best superhero movies transcend their framework to become something more, something fresh within this genre and, honestly, I don't think this offered anything fresh. Maybe that's just me. Regardless of all of that, this is still a great superhero movie and, as mentioned, this should have been DC's first step in their attempts to create their own cinematic universe. As such, we cannot turn back time and, as I mentioned earlier, Wonder Woman should be DC's top priority right now. Wonder Woman needs to be the centerpiece of their extended universe if they want to come close to rivaling Marvel. Or even just being a strong number 2. They're number 2 by default, but they're not a strong number 2. With that said, this is a great start to this franchise and I'm eagerly looking forward to more from this character and how DC decides to expand the character. I would easily recommend this.


for a long time, people didn't know how to approach the story. When Patty and I had our creative conversations about the character, we realized that Diana can still be a normal woman, one with very high values, but still a woman. She can be sensitive. She is smart and independent and emotional. She can be confused. She can lose her confidence. She can have confidence. She is everything. She has a human heart.[7]

Due to the reboot of the character following Crisis on Infinite Earths, numerous things no longer made sense in terms of continuity as it related to the remainder of the DC Universe. As her first overall appearance was now in continuity around the Legends miniseries, it no longer made sense that she was a founding member of the Justice League of America. This founding position was instead given retroactively to Black Canary. Later it was decided that she should be given this position back and thus both she and Black Canary were considered founding members of the Justice League. In reference to the Justice League though, although she has more than 400 combined appearances therein, she has had most of her character development in her own series.
Vox stated "Trevor is the superhero girlfriend comic book movies need".[212] The San Francisco Chronicle's Mick LaSalle lauded the performances of Gadot, Pine, Huston, and Thewlis while commending the film's "different perspective" and humor.[213] Richard Roeper of Chicago Sun-Times described Gadot's performance as inspirational, heroic, heartfelt and endearing and the most "real" Wonder Woman portrayal.[214]
An immortal Amazon warrior goddess who is the crown princess of Themyscira and the daughter of Queen Hippolyta and Zeus given to the Amazons to raise.[12] Describing Wonder Woman and her appeal, Gadot said, "She's relatable. She has the heart of a human and is very compassionate, but her experiences—or lack of them, her naivete, really—make her interested in everything around her and able to view the world in a way that we'd all like to: with a genuine curiosity."[13] On Diana's relationship with her mother, Gadot said, "Diana is a very opinionated girl. Her mother is very opinionated. Her mother is very protective as well, and they have, you know, the very natural clash that a mother has with her daughter, with their daughters, the first time they want to leave home."[14] On taking on the role as Wonder Woman, Gadot stated, "I feel very privileged that I got the opportunity to portray such an iconic, strong female character. I adore this character and everything that she stands for and everything that she symbolizes."[15] On Diana going to the world, Gadot stated, "When Diana comes to the real world she's completely oblivious about gender and society rules, that women are not equal to men."[16] Describing Diana's relationship with her mother and aunts, Jenkins said, "She is the only child they raised together. And their love for her manifests in a different way for each of them."[17] On working with Gadot, Jenkins said, "Gal quickly became the person I wanted to talk to about everything. We'd shoot together all day. And then on weekends, we'd be like, 'What do you want to do?' That's maybe not totally normal."[18]
In a mid-credits scene, Diana returns to Washington and confronts Veronica, having since figured out that she was the mastermind behind Villany Inc. and turning Vanessa against Diana by killing Julia personally. Veronica boldly announces that she will invade Themyscira again to profit from the Amazons' technology, whereupon Diana issues a challenge for her to dare this by plunging her sword into Veronica's desk before leaving.
The good parts of the show - Lynda Carter, first of all. She seemed to hit her stride in the part as the series continued and she is often so charming and innocent that you can't help but like her. Her values and strength of character are idealistic, but they're also missing in today's female heroes, who are so dark sometimes, they lose their charm. In many ways, watching Lynda as Wonder Woman is a breath of fresh air and of course, there still doesn't seem to be a woman other than her who could wear that outfit and pull it off. When Wonder Woman first walks on the city streets in the pilot, you don't know what to think, but Lynda plays her so innocently she's fantastic.
Wonder Woman is not the first film, nor will it be the last, to veer away from super pets. For example, Krypto and Bat-Cow are fun in the comics, but might not necessarily have a place in the big-budget blockbuster world. The live-action film universe generally tends to be a bit more grounded, and, with a limited amount of screen time, the narrative focus needs to be kept a bit tighter than that of a long-running comic book series.
In May 2017, early tracking had Wonder Woman opening with $65–75 million, and possibly as high as $105 million.[179][180][181][182][176] The film opened Friday, June 2, 2017, across 4,165 theaters and made $38.7 million on its opening day, including $3.7 million in IMAX. It was the biggest single-day gross for a woman-directed film, ahead of the $35.9 million opening Friday of Catherine Hardwicke's Twilight in 2008 and the biggest opening day for a woman-led comic book superhero film, ahead of Ghost in the Shell ($7 million).[183] This included $11 million it made from Thursday previews, also the best start for a film directed by a woman, surpassing Fifty Shades of Grey's $8.6 million which was directed by Sam Taylor-Johnson, and the third-biggest of the year, behind Beauty and the Beast and Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2. Of that, $1.5 million came from IMAX screenings.[184][185]
Granted by Hermes (God of Messengers), her top speed has never been well documented, but she has entered the speed force under her own power, implying she can accelerate to at least light speed. The Flash has said that Wonder Woman can easily keep up with him and she has been seen keeping up with Flash going faster than hypersonic speed. She has been shown to be on par with some of the fastest characters in the DC Universe such as Jesse Quick. She can disarm human opponents of their weapons instantly and she can immobilize her opponents in the blink of an eye, as she showed when she speedblitzed White Martian and Genocide into space in no time and was able to take down Amazo before he could finish a word. She is such a well trained athlete that in combat, her reflexes even surprise the likes of Superman.
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Diana then arrives to stop Ares, and brings Steve Trevor to the US.Arriving in Boston, she meets Professor Julia Kapatelis. After fighting a monster named Decay sent by Phobos, a son of Ares, Diana, Julia and Steve discover Ares' plan: to start a nuclear war worldwide. Joined by Steve's friend Michaelis, the group travel to the military bases Ares' minions had taken control of and avert nuclear war. Ares
Wonder Woman has also appeared in the 2013 NetherRealm Studios fighting game, INJUSTICE: Gods Among Us, as a playable character with her own set of super moves and alternate constumes, one of which was a New 52 skin. In the game, Wonder Woman is summoned alongside Aquaman, Green Lantern, Green Arrow, Batman, and the Joker into a world where Superman rules with an iron fist and said world's Wonder Woman is his second-in-command. Wonder Woman must unite with the others and this world's Batman to defeat Regime Superman for good. She is voiced by Susan Eisenberg.
Wonder Woman was minorly associated with the series 52, and in the One Year Later universe following Infinite Crisis she becomes a member of the Department of Metahuman Affairs. The most memorable story arc from this era was the much maligned Amazons Attack story arc, which many fans felt was not engaging nor did it do enough service to the well-established characters. After Gail Simone took over the series, a number of memorable story arcs took place, foremost among them Rise of the Olympian and Warkiller. Following the departure of Gail Simone the character was relaunched into the storyline Odyssey, where she must discover who she is and what has happened to her life. During this period she also took part in the events of Blackest Night where she was first a Black Lantern and later a Star Sapphire.

The Amazons have traditionally hidden from “Man’s World” on a remote isle. For the first four-plus decades of her comic career, including the classic Lynda Carter TV show, the place was known simply as Paradise Island. In 1986, artist-writer George Pérez led a major revamp of the comic. In his seminal series, the Amazons lived in the city-state of Themyscira (as they do in Greek myth) until it was sacked by the army of Heracles. They resettle on Paradise Island, which they eventually rename in honor of their former homeland.
In 2010, Warner Bros. stated that a Wonder Woman film was in development, along with films based on DC Comics superheroes the Flash and Aquaman.[83] Both Wonder Woman and Aquaman were still under consideration for solo film subjects as of June 2013.[84] DC Entertainment president Diane Nelson said Wonder Woman "has been, since I started, one of the top three priorities for DC and for Warner Bros. We are still trying right now, but she's tricky."[85] On October 5, 2013, WB chairman and CEO Kevin Tsujihara said he wanted to get Wonder Woman in a film or on TV.[86] Shortly afterward, Paul Feig said he had pitched the studio an idea for Wonder Woman as an action-comedy film.[87][88] The studio then began to search for female directors to direct the film.[89] While Michelle MacLaren was the studio's initial choice to direct (and while she initially indicated interest),[90][91][92] she eventually left the project due to creative differences.[93]
Some men were unhappy with women-only screenings held at the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema in Austin, with some opponents of the gender-restricted screening stating on platforms such as Facebook that such screenings were discriminatory against men.[171][172][173] A gay Albany Law School professor initiated a complaint with Austin's Equal Employment and Fair Housing Office claiming discrimination against male prospective customers and employees of the theater.[174] The chain responded with an online statement saying the event "may have created confusion—we want everybody to see this film" and announced a similar event at their Brooklyn location. Tickets sold out in less than an hour, prompting the chain to schedule additional screenings.[171] On July 18, Alamo Drafthouse proposed settlement offers of a Wonder Woman DVD to the complainants, stating "Respondent did not realize that advertising a 'women's only' screening was a violation of discrimination laws."[175]
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An iron-fisted general of the German Army during World War I.[29] Huston described Ludendorff as a "pragmatist, realist, patriotic, fighting for his country", further explaining, "he lost his son on the German front lines and was just quite tortured, diabolical, stubborn and believes that what he's doing is for the betterment of mankind."[30] On his character, Huston said, "Ludendorff is a believer that war is a natural habitat for humans." Huston stated the film as an anti-war film and "somebody like Ludendorff would probably think that the idea that love conquers all is quite a naive concept. But finally it's true and sometimes the best way to examine mankind is from another perspective." On the genre of the film, Huston said, "It's Greek mythology. It's the origin of story and sometimes we need demigods to look at us to understand what our weaknesses are. It serves the mythological world."[31]
As Diana’s half-brother, Ares (also known as Mars in various comic  runs) is often referred to as Wonder Woman’s archenemy. As his origins have switched several times from Greek to Roman mythology and back, different authors have penned him in several different lights, but always with similar features. For example, Ares has almost always opposed the Amazons as well as the goddess Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love.
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