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Wonder Woman's sexual and bondage themes in her earliest days were not without purpose, however. Her creator, William Moulton Marston, theorized that human relationships could be broken down into dominance, submission, inducement and compliance roles which were embedded into our psyche. Because males were, more often than not, dominant in societies, Marston believed that "Women as a sex, are many times better equipped to assume emotional leadership than are males." [265] Marston wanted to convey his progressive ideals, through his use of bondage imagery, that women are not only capable of leadership roles, but should be in charge of society. Although Marston had good intentions with these themes, in Wonder Woman's early appearances, the bondage elements were controversial, as they were often seen to overly fetishize women in power rather than promote such women. Noah Berlatsky criticized this imagery in Wonder Woman's earliest days noting that "the comics take sensual pleasure in women’s disempowerment." [266] Despite having the mixed messages of this imagery, Marston fiercely believed that women would soon rule the earth and meant to showcase his predictions through sexual themes in his stories. He was an open feminist while studying at Harvard where he once said "Girls are also human beings, a point often overlooked!" [267]
Wonder Woman had a minor role in Young Justice. Initially, the character was going to be excluded from the show due to legal red tape, but was included at the last minute. However, as a result of only being cleared for use late in the production cycle, she only had several speaking appearances. In the second season, she could be seen as the mentor of Wonder Girl. She was voiced by Maggie Q.

Critics such as Valerie Estelle Frankel support Jenkins's vision. Frankel argues that the film subverts the male gaze,[244] stating that the construction of Wonder Woman tends to shift every few decades as it reflects the state of feminism during different time periods, including third-wave feminism (which reflects Jenkins's approach).[244][248][249] Zoe Williams offers a similar argument, stating that while Wonder Woman "is sort of naked a lot of the time," that is not, at the same time, "objectification so much as a cultural reset: having thighs, actual thighs you can kick things with, not thighs that look like arms, is a feminist act".[250] Williams then juxtaposes Wonder Woman to past female action heroes such as Sarah Connor, Ellen Ripley, and Lara Croft, whom she suggests were all constructed for the male gaze, in which a "female warrior becomes a sex object", (a point which she argues that Jenkins directly references in the film).[250]
^ Colluccio, Ali. "Top 5: Wonder Woman Reboots". iFanboy. Archived from the original on April 12, 2012. Retrieved April 10, 2012. After she was "erased" from existence in the final pages of Crisis on Infinite Earths, George Perez, Len Wein and Greg Potter brought the Amazon Princess back to the DC Universe. While the basics of the story remained the same, Wonder Woman;s powers were adjusted to include Beauty from Aphrodite, Strength from Demeter, Wisdom from Athena, Speed and Flight from Hermes, Eyes of the Hunter from Artemis, and Truth from Hestia. This run established Paradise Island as the mythical Amazon capital, Themyscira. Perez's Diana is not only strong and smart, but graceful and kind – the iconic Wonder Woman.
John Byrne's run included a period in which Diana's mother Hippolyta served as Wonder Woman, having traveled back to the 1940s, while Diana ascended to Mount Olympus as the Goddess of Truth after being killed in issue #124. In addition, Wonder Woman's Amazon ally Nubia was re-introduced as Nu'Bia, scripted by a different author.[40] Byrne posited that Hippolyta had been the Golden Age Wonder Woman. Byrne restored the series' status quo in his last issue.[41]

"Gas was intended to win the war. On that much Wonder Woman is absolutely right." said David Hambling in Popular Mechanics.[225] Rachel Becker of The Verge stated that despite the scientific liberties of using a "hydrogen-based" chemical weapon as a plot device, the film succeeds in evoking real and horrifying history. "First off, mustard gas is such a horrible, terrifying weapon, it doesn't need to be made more potent. But if you were a chemist bent on raining destruction on the Allied forces, you wouldn't do it by replacing the sulfur atom in mustard gas with a hydrogen atom. You'd know that sulfur is the linchpin holding together this poisonous molecule."[226]


Paquette detailed the changes he made to Wonder Woman's costume, stating that he removed the iconic American flag theme and instead incorporated a Greek influence: "The animal associated to Aphrodite is a dove so instead of an eagle on [Wonder Woman's] breastplate, it will be more of a dove. It's not the American eagle, it's the Aphrodite dove. Stuff that creates [the letter] W is by accident, so it's not like she already has a letter of the alphabet on her [costume]. In the end I've created a structure so it feels inevitable for Wonder Woman to look the way she does."[246]

In the DC Multiverse, Kangas are a fictional alien species similar to kangaroos. Multiple iterations of the Wonder Woman comics portrays Amazons on the backs of these giant beasts as a common mode of transportation. In the comics, Diana had a partner Kanga by the name of Jumpa, who served as both pet and crime fighting companion. Kangas were left out of the movie, and were replaced by horses.
Demeter, the goddess of agriculture and fertility, blessed Diana with strength drawn from the Earth spirit Gaea, making her one of the physically strongest heroes in the DC Universe and the strongest female hero in the DC Universe. This strength has allowed her to easily overwhelm Superman and Supergirl. She has also held her own against Darkseid. Her strength has no measurable limits and she can break the Chronus Scepter, which is universal in its destructive power. However, now Diana is the daughter of Zeus, king of the Greek Gods, so it is unclear as to how much of her power and strength is a direct result of her divine heritage.[180] Her connection to the earth allows her to heal at an accelerated rate so long as she is in contact with the planet. However, as mentioned earlier, now that she is a demigoddess, it has been suggested that she heals extremely quickly also due to her divine heritage. In rare cases where she has been gravely injured, Diana showed the ability to physically merge with the earth, causing whatever injuries or poisons to be expelled from her body; such an act is considered sacred, and can only be used in extreme cases.[181]
The team learns that a gala will be held at the nearby German High Command. Steve and Diana separately infiltrate the party, with Steve intending to locate the gas and destroy it, and Diana hoping to kill Ludendorff, believing that he is Ares and thus killing him will end the war. Steve stops her to avoid jeopardizing his mission, but this allows Ludendorff to unleash the gas on Veld, killing its inhabitants. Blaming Steve for intervening, Diana pursues Ludendorff to a base where the gas is being loaded into a bomber aircraft bound for London. Diana fights and kills him, but is confused and disillusioned when his death does not stop the war.
The American theme of Diana's costume was explained by Pérez in the Challenge of the Gods storyline in which Diana engaged in a series of trials arranged by Zeus as punishment for refusing his advances. Diana met the spirit of Steve Trevor's mother, Diana Trevor, who was clad in armor identical to her own. Trevor revealed that during World War II she had crashed on Themyscira while on duty as a U.S. Army pilot. She blundered into an Amazon battle against Cottus, a multi-armed demon, at the portal to the underworld. Trevor was drawn into the battle, although she was armed only with her side arm. She wounded the beast before suffering a mortal blow, allowing the Amazons to reseal the portal.[37]
When she is preparing for the final game (Teaming up with Supergirl, Starfire, Bumblebee and Batgirl against Lobo, Maxima, Bleez, Mongal and Blackfire), the competition is interrupted by Lena Luthor. Wonder Woman starts putting civilians safe, including the Embassador, who, out of fear, orders her to star with him to protect him. She refuses and returns to the batlle, angering the Embassador. She fight Lena and then Brainiac. Upon their defeat, Wonder Woman rejoins with her mother, thinking she dissapointed her by no following the Embassador orders, but Hippolyta is proud instead, stating that Wonder Woman will be an amazing Queen.
Wonder Woman has been featured in various media from radio to television and film, and appears in merchandise sold around the world, such as apparel, toys, dolls, jewelry, and video games. Shannon Farnon, Susan Eisenberg, Maggie Q, Lucy Lawless, Keri Russell, Michelle Monaghan, Rosario Dawson, Cobie Smulders, and Halsey among others, have provided the character's voice for animated adaptations. Wonder Woman has been depicted in both film and television by Cathy Lee Crosby, Lynda Carter, and in the DC Extended Universe films by Gal Gadot.

Many writers have depicted Diana in different personalities and tone; between both of her diametric extremes; that of a worldly warrior, a highly compassionate and calm ambassador, and sometimes also as a naive and innocent person, depending on the writer. What has remained constant, and is a mainstay of the character, is her nurturing humanity: her overwhelming belief in love, empathy, compassion, and having a strong conscience.[citation needed] This trait had been the reason for her induction into the Star Sapphires.[69][70]
Along with the change in timeline, there is also an altered setting and various character tweaks. One example of this is the fact that the United States of America is not at all featured in the movie. Wonder Woman herself might not be from the United States, but her red, white, and blue outfit certainly embodied some sort of American patriotism, which was occasionally seen within the comics.
Duing the Perez run on the character, there were not as many story arcs either, but they did become more defined. Her entrance into Man’s World was to stop a global nuclear war created by Ares. She also had introduced a modern version of the Cheetah, Circe, Doctor Psycho and Silver Swan. One of the defining story arcs at this time was the Challenge of the Gods, where she discovers the truth about her own past as she journeys into the underworld. In this time as well she was a part of numerous company-wide crossovers including Millennium, Invasion and one focused on herself, the War of the Gods. The latter was Perez’s swansong on the character and with Messner Loebs taking over afterwards the direction of the character changed again somewhat. Under his direction, Diana became involved in battle factions of organized crime in Boston, and faced off against Ares Buchanan and the White Magician. This resulted in Wonder Woman being marooned in space, and returning to uncover the plot. During the events of Zero Hour a slightly different version of her origin is told, and Artemis wins the right to be Wonder Woman in another contest. This ends eventually with Diana battling the White Magician after Artemis has been killed. The John Byrne run equally was without as many defined story arcs except specifically with how her death affected others. This was also incorporated into the company wide Genesis event. Once she returned she faced a new villain known as Devastation who she battled occasionally, and she also took responsibility for Cassandra Sandsmark (who would later become Wonder Girl.) As a prominent character within the DC universe she took part in company-wide crossovers like Our Worlds at War and the Joker’s Last Laugh. When Rucka took over, some of the character's most memorable story arcs occurred, and most famously among them Stoned and the Superman story arc Sacrifice which ended in Wonder Woman #219 with her killing Maxwell Lord.
Following Pérez, William Messner-Loebs took over as writer and Mike Deodato became the artist for the title. Messner-Loebs introduced Diana's Daxamite friend Julia in Wonder Woman vol. 2 #68 during the six-issue space arc.[38][39] Messner-Loebs's most memorable contribution to the title was the introduction of the red-headed Amazon Artemis, who took over the mantle of Wonder Woman for a short time. He also included a subplot during his run in an attempt to further humanize Diana by having her work for a fictional fast food chain called "Taco Whiz".[9]
The team learns that a gala will be held at the nearby German High Command. Steve and Diana separately infiltrate the party, with Steve intending to locate the gas and destroy it, and Diana hoping to kill Ludendorff, believing that he is Ares and thus killing him will end the war. Steve stops her to avoid jeopardizing his mission, but this allows Ludendorff to unleash the gas on Veld, killing its inhabitants. Blaming Steve for intervening, Diana pursues Ludendorff to a base where the gas is being loaded into a bomber aircraft bound for London. Diana fights and kills him, but is confused and disillusioned when his death does not stop the war.
The alter ego of Princess Maru, Doctor Poison was a 1940s Wonder Woman villain who concocted toxins first for the Nazis and later for the Japanese during World War II. A more recent incarnation, Marina Maru, was initially a granddaughter who assumed the Doctor Poison mantle. Subsequent versions of Marina Maru have been Russian and Japanese, but all are known for wearing hooded disguises, dreaming up deadly chemical weapons, and constantly being thwarted by Wonder Woman.
The character has been featured in direct-to-DVD animated films and CGI theatrical releases, such as The Lego Movie (2014). Within the live-action DC Extended Universe films, Wonder Woman debuted in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016) and was featured as the main character in Wonder Woman (2017). In November 2017, she appeared in the DCEU release Justice League.
But under the new 1987 re-boot of the title, under the editorship of Karen Berger, and with the writing and art of George Perez at the helm of the book, the same-sex appreciation by Wonder Woman and the Amazons was more than hinted-at and this was established quickly in the new run of the title. Upon her first sight of supporting character Vanessa Kapatelis (in issue #3), she is shown smiling upwards at Kapatelis, thinking to herself "I've never seen another woman quite like her...she's so young...so vulnerable...so beautiful..."[247] Three years later, in the very first issue (#38) of a new decade, there is a story-line presenting a cultural exchange between appointed leaders from 'Man's World', who are the first mortals to visit Themyscira in this continuity, and the Amazons of Themyscira, in Themyscira, itself. The guest Unitarian minister, Reverend Cantwell, asks the Amazon Mnemosyne "..."Don't you miss the sharing God intended for the sexes?" to which Mnemosyne replied "Some do. They have sworn themselves to Artemis, the virgin hunter, and Athena, the chaste warrior. Others choose the way of Narcissus. But most of us find satisfaction in each other -- three thousand years can be a long time, reverend."[248]. Probably more than at any other time in the then nearly fifty-year history of the character, the Amazons were explicitly and unequivocally defined, in general, as lesbian. Additionally, Kevin Mayer, brother of the major supporting character Myndi Mayer, was openly gay and this was treated sympathetically[249]. By this time, DC Comics was a Warner Brothers-owned company, and had been for over 20 years.

The Invisible Plane appeared in the very first comic stories, including All-Star Comics #8, where it is shown as being able to fly at over 2,000 mph (3,200 km/h) and to send out rainbow rays that penetrate the mist around Paradise Island, as well as landing stealthily and having a built-in radio. Wonder Woman is seen storing the plane at an abandoned farm near Washington, D.C., in the barn; she goes there as Lt. Prince and changes clothes in some of the earliest tales. Though never explicitly stated, the Plane is presumably stored there when not in use for the rest of the Pre-Crisis era. In a story published shortly after, it flies at 40 miles (64 km) a second.[citation needed]

Before I start with my thoughts on this and everything surrounding, let me just say that, FINALLY, the DC Extended Universe gets one right with this movie. You don't know how long I've been waiting to say those words. Though, to be fair, after The Dark Knight Trilogy (THE best superhero trilogy bar none), I haven't kept up with any of DC's efforts to create its own massive universe. I find Superman to be interminably boring, so I had no interest (outside of Michael Shannon) in seeing Man of Steel. DC, in my opinion, made the wrong choice to keep Batman dark and brooding after The Dark Knight Trilogy so, again, I had no real interest in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice outside of maybe seeing Wonder Woman. DC has done a poor job at building its own extended universe so, once again, I had no interest in the Justice League movie. You see how it is. Of the movies in this universe, the only one I've seen was Suicide Squad, which, while decent, wasn't good and squandered its potential. Wonder Woman was the only shining beacon of hope in the horizon, the chance to (finally) do a female superhero movie right. Elektra and Catwoman both sucked and Marvel, since their ascent, wasted their chance to be first in this race by not doing a Black Widow movie. Here's the thing though, before I get to Wonder Woman, and I've mentioned this a lot, but DC Comics is essentially playing catch-up with Marvel. That's why you see them bumbling and fumbling major movies, because they know they have to catch up, since Marvel has, pretty much had a monopoly on this superhero movie business since Iron Man came out in 2008. The thing about Marvel is that they knew they couldn't rush things, they had to slowly plant the seeds for something bigger and, now, you see that that patience has paid off immensely. I don't know how much money the MCU has raked in for Disney (and this is counting merchandising, DVD sales and other forms of revenue), but it has to be a multi-billion dollar franchise for Disney. DC hasn't had the same patience, as they're following the same template without understanding why it worked in the first place. It can't be all at once, it has to be done little by little. Rome wasn't built in a day and DC has attempted to build Rome (with its extended universe) in 20 minutes. But, at the same time, DC wasn't always a point of mockery. DC characters were the first to make the transition from comic to successful major motion pictures with Superman (in 1978) and Batman (in 1989). Marvel was playing catch-up to DC in the era following Batman's successful release. They released some truly awful movies in the 90s, like Captain America in 1990 and The Fantastic Four in 94, which was so bad that it hasn't been released yet. There may have been others, but those are the major ones that pop to mind. So, in DC's defense, they can still make something of their universe. But, and to me this is most important, the whole thing needs to not be so dark and serious. Marvel has succeeded in large part because they know how to pace their movies. They know that you need comedy in movies like this. It can't be all darkness and brooding characters struggling with their own moral dilemmas about what is right and what is wrong. The whole look of the films also needs some more life injected into them. Marvel movies are diverse in settings and cinematography, so, in spite of being set in the same universe, the MCU films feel different tonally and visually. In the DC, every movie sort of looks the same. With a dark, grey and blue hue. And, as great as this movie is, once they get to London, it's really more of the same in terms of visuals. Having said all of that, let's move on shall we? I'm honestly quite surprised that DC waited THIS long to make a Wonder Woman movie, particularly when, to me, this is the movie that should have started your whole extended universe. This should have been the starting point for all things DCEU. Firstly, if we're doing this in chronological order so, technically, this should have been first and, secondly, it's a great movie, so you start off with this and people would actually be pumped for the DCEU instead of looking at things so cynically now. Because as things are now, Wonder Woman feels like the exception to the rule that DCEU movies aren't exactly good. It's an asterisk. And that's not to minimize this film's significance, because I do like the shift and I feel that DC knows that, at least for this moment in time, Wonder Woman is its most important character. People have seen Superman and they've seen Batman and that's not to say that they're tired of the same shit, because there's still many fanboys/girls out there, but I think people want something that's new in that universe and Wonder Woman provides that for people. So that's why, in my opinion, DC needs to worry far more about Wonder Woman, as she needs to be their top priority, for your cinematic universe going forward as opposed to the old, familiar faces. Having said that, let's get going, shall we? I think first I need to talk about Gal Gadot's casting as Wonder Woman. At first, honestly, I didn't get it. Don't get me wrong, Gal Gadot is a very talented and attractive woman, but I just didn't get IT for the longest time. But, having finally seen her as this character, I understand the decision to cast her in the role. Firstly, for some reason or another, she's even more stunningly beautiful as Wonder Woman than even I imagined. Plus, honestly, I find she brings all the values to the character that she needs. So, in my opinion, it's a good combination of both. Diana Prince (Wonder Woman) herself comes from a long line of Amazonian warrior women created by Zeus in order to protect mankind, really, from itself. Ares, the god of war, being tots jelly of humanity, decided to plot its destruction by influencing them and his influence leading to the humans starting wars against each other. Ares has also killed all of the gods with the exception of Zeus himself. Zeus used the last of his power to wound Ares and making him retreat. Long story short, Zeus essentially hid Themyscira (the island the Amazons live in) to keep from Ares from finding it and left them a weapon called the Godkiller for Ares' return. Blah, blah, blah, long story short, Steve Trevor (an Allied spy) crashes his plane off the coast of Themyscira, wherein German soldiers follow him and there, they fight against the Amazonian women who, after losing some of their own, including Diana's aunt, defeat the German soldiers. Steve, after telling them about the Great War (WWI) attempts to enlist the help of the Amazonian women in order to turn the tide of war, but Hippolyta (Diana's mother) has none of it. Steve has found this notebook by this German doctor that tells of an attempt to create a deadlier form of mustard gas, which he's trying to put a stop to or else millions more will die. Diana, being incredibly idealistic, figures that this is Ares' return to the world of men and she needs to put a stop to it by killing Ares. Diana eventually does leave with Steve, she'll never be able to return to Themyscira again as a result. So, eventually, Steve and Diana make their way to London, where they begin their plan to fight back against the Germans (pre-Hitler) and attempt to put a stop to this deadlier mustard gas. I will say that the movie does miss a chance to tell an incredibly interesting story of Diana having to adjust to the gender differences once she makes it to London. Women aren't allowed in the military, they're not even allowed in this war council to discuss an armistice between them and the Germans. Diana, of course, finds her way in this meeting and she browbeats one of the generals for being a coward, acting as if the lives of his soldiers are less important than his own and not fighting alongside his men. Women, at least in this point in time, have not been allowed the vote either. And, honestly, it would have been incredibly interesting to explore that dynamic of Diana, coming from an island where women are clearly superior in every way (even though there's no men) to a place where women are so clearly oppressed. There's a few hints of it here and there, but I think the movie would have benefited from exploring that dynamic a little bit more, in my opinion. One of the things I liked about this movie is that, unlike a lot of superhero movies, I do think they try to give a face at the people that are being affected by the war and how that motivates Diana to try and help them, whether it's by driving the German soldiers from this small town or getting rid of Dr. Maru and Ludendorff, the ones not letting this armistice go through and who are also developing the deadlier mustard gas. There's an interesting debate here that, honestly, I wish the movie would have stuck with. There comes a point, much later in the film where Diana kills Ludendorff, as has been her goal all along, since she feels Ludendorff is Ares and killing him stops the fighting. She does, in fact, kill Ludendorf, but the fighting does not stop. In fact, you could argue, that it gets worse. Diana questions Steve about why the fighting hasn't stopped and there's a discussion between the two where Steve says that, maybe, just maybe that's just how we are, we're (hard)wired to self-destruct. There's just something to the idea that Diana believes that only one person is to blame for all of this and by stopping that one person stops the war itself. It's an interesting idea because it brings to mind the questions that, really, maybe we're not really worth saving in some way, if all we do is keep killing each other every few years. Not many superhero movies deal with this topic in this way. But, of course, you could say that it's a bit of a red herring given that, in fact, Ludendorff was not Ares and, instead, was someone they considered an ally. But it's interesting to explore regardless, given that Diana is still so naive about certain things in 'modern' times and how her idealistic values and ideas aren't shared by everyone around her. I think that's probably one of the best thing this movie does, just sort of explore the idea that not everyone shares Diana's values and how, in a way, her views are sort either antiquated, ahead of their time or both. Steve, who's been helpful to her every step of the way, does stand in her way in some scenes before, of course, Diana takes matter into her own hands. Diana and Steve's relationship is also one of the strongest points of the movies. This is in large part, of course, to how great Gal Gadot and Chris Pine are, their chemistry is excellent and, while the movie does contain a romantic angle between the two, it doesn't feel forced or unnatural. As I mention, Gal Gadot's performance is very strong. She's a badass, but she also brings heart and life to the character. She's not necessarily a goody two-shoes like Captain America, but they share some similarities in how they view the world. You can see how people would be drawn to her kind and compassionate nature and that's not something that, say, a lot of actors playing superheroes are able to capture. The film does have a good bit of action and it is pretty damn good all things considered. There were some parts that I felt were too Zak Snyder-y, like the whole slo-mo things that Zak Snyder abused in 300. But, at the very least, in this case, it can be explained by the fact that one of Diana's superpowers is seeing bullets in slo-mo, which allows her to deflect them before they harm her or anybody. So, at least, it's not a stylistic choice that was abused, it has actual significance. The action gets a thumbs up from me as if that wasn't obvious. So you know how I mentioned earlier that the movie touches on the fact that, maybe, humanity isn't worth saving if all we are is doomed to destroy ourselves. Well, later on in the movie, Diana comes to the realization that, in spite of everything, humanity is worth fighting for. One of the things I didn't like, there's actually a couple of minor issues I had, is the fact that the whole ending of Diana saying that she believes love will end up saving us is really kind of corny and cheesy. Not that the message isn't a worthy one, it's just how it's handled. And, really, Steve's ultimate act of sacrifice was one made for love, so it makes sense that Diana would believe that, it's execution is still a bit corny. Another thing that bothered me is that, ultimately, the fighting DID stop after Diana killed Ares and, I don't know, I feel like that's too simplistic of a conclusion for something as complex as the first World War. I like the earlier themes which, while certainly more bleak (and that's something DCEU could do to remove from its movies), it's still a better conclusion and, at the same time, Diana can still come to the same conclusion she did as a result of Steve's actions. Minor issues, really, as it didn't really affect my overall enjoyment of the film. Having said that, do I think that this is one of the best superhero movies ever made? No, not really. It's the best movie based on one of DC's properties since the Dark Knight Trilogy finished off in 2012. It's a great superhero movie, with a strong origin story at its core, great performances from Gal Gadot and Chris Pine and a more humanistic approach to its conflict, in that the people Diana and Steve are trying to save aren't entirely faceless as they usually are in these movies (even in the MCU). But, at the same time, there's nothing really about this movie that extends the boundaries of what we know the superhero genre to be. It works solely within that framework. And there's nothing wrong with that but, to me, the best superhero movies transcend their framework to become something more, something fresh within this genre and, honestly, I don't think this offered anything fresh. Maybe that's just me. Regardless of all of that, this is still a great superhero movie and, as mentioned, this should have been DC's first step in their attempts to create their own cinematic universe. As such, we cannot turn back time and, as I mentioned earlier, Wonder Woman should be DC's top priority right now. Wonder Woman needs to be the centerpiece of their extended universe if they want to come close to rivaling Marvel. Or even just being a strong number 2. They're number 2 by default, but they're not a strong number 2. With that said, this is a great start to this franchise and I'm eagerly looking forward to more from this character and how DC decides to expand the character. I would easily recommend this.
A Blackfoot demi-god,[52] and a smuggler who trades with both sides of the war and knows how to get people across the front lines.[48][53] On his casting, Brave Rock said, "I had no idea it was for Wonder Woman. I lost it when I showed up and I couldn't remember my lines. I didn't take it literally until a month later, I got a call saying I got the role and they wanted me to fly to London for a fitting."[54] Brave Rock raised several concerns with Jenkins over the representation of the character in the film, particularly that he was not comfortable playing into stereotypes and that he was not keen on his character being simply known as "Chief".[55] Jenkins responded by giving him some extra creative control over his character which Brave Rock says was "unprecedented".[55]

A Blackfoot demi-god,[52] and a smuggler who trades with both sides of the war and knows how to get people across the front lines.[48][53] On his casting, Brave Rock said, "I had no idea it was for Wonder Woman. I lost it when I showed up and I couldn't remember my lines. I didn't take it literally until a month later, I got a call saying I got the role and they wanted me to fly to London for a fitting."[54] Brave Rock raised several concerns with Jenkins over the representation of the character in the film, particularly that he was not comfortable playing into stereotypes and that he was not keen on his character being simply known as "Chief".[55] Jenkins responded by giving him some extra creative control over his character which Brave Rock says was "unprecedented".[55]

By the time that Robert Kanigher took over the character, a change away from traditional comics as a whole was accomplished. He eventually veered completely away from superheroism and essentially only told stories involving the Wonder Family, which consisted of Wonder Woman, her teenage version Wonder Girl, her baby version Wonder Tot and her mother. This eventually proved not very popular and Kanigher was forced to rethink the character and cast her in a more traditional superhero context (he actually explained this decision in comics to the reader with his various creations vying to remain in continuity against his wishes). It was at this time for instance that Wonder Woman saw the return of some characters that had been missing for some time such as the Cheetah or Doctor Psycho. It was also at this time that she became a founding member of the original Justice League of America.


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Additional music featured in the film are: "Another Little Drink Wouldn't Do Us Any Harm" by Clifford Grey and Nat Ayer and performed by Edgar Trevor and Cecil Cooper; "Molly O'Morgan" written by Fred Godfrey and Will Letters and performed by Ella Retford; "It's a Long Way to Tipperary" written by Jack Judge and Harry Williams; "Sous les ponts de Paris" written by Jean Rodor and Vincent Scotto and performed by Lucienne Delyle; "I'll Walk Beside You" written by Edward Lockton and Alan Murray and performed by Ewen Bremner; "Green Grow the Rushes, O" written by Robert Burns and performed by Ewen Bremner; and "Schatzwalzer Op. 4" written by Johann Strauss II and performed by the Berlin String Quartet.[145]
The American theme of Diana's costume was explained by Pérez in the Challenge of the Gods storyline in which Diana engaged in a series of trials arranged by Zeus as punishment for refusing his advances. Diana met the spirit of Steve Trevor's mother, Diana Trevor, who was clad in armor identical to her own. Trevor revealed that during World War II she had crashed on Themyscira while on duty as a U.S. Army pilot. She blundered into an Amazon battle against Cottus, a multi-armed demon, at the portal to the underworld. Trevor was drawn into the battle, although she was armed only with her side arm. She wounded the beast before suffering a mortal blow, allowing the Amazons to reseal the portal.[37]
As noted above, in most of the comic iterations, the Amazons must find a champion to help stem an existential threat from the outside world. Up until the ’80s, Wonder Woman was pressed into service against Nazi Germany. Pérez’s version, set during the Cold War, changed it to the nuclear threat presented by the Soviet Union. The film, meanwhile, is set in 1918, during the waning days of World War I.
Aegeus Angle Man Ares/Mars Baron Blitzkrieg Baroness Paula von Gunther Blue Snowman Veronica Cale Captain Wonder Cheetah Circe Dark Angel Decay Doctor Cyber Doctor Poison Doctor Psycho Duke of Deception Earl of Greed Egg Fu/Chang Tzu Eviless First Born Genocide Giganta Grail Hades Hypnota Kung Lord Conquest/Count of Conquest Mask Medusa Minister Blizzard Osira Queen Clea Red Panzer Silver Swan Tezcatlipoca Zara
^ "Superhero Makeovers: Wonder Woman, part two". The Screamsheet. Archived from the original on January 7, 2012. Retrieved February 10, 2011. Desperate to save her daughter, she claimed that Diana had failed in her role as an ambassador to Man's World and called for a do-over on the contest that had determined Diana fit to carry the Wonder Woman mantle in the first place.
Most comic iterations of Wonder Woman, including the original comic series, take place during WWII. However, the film adaptation takes place decades before this, during the first World War. Truth be told, this is a smart move, seeing as it is able to separate itself from MCU picture Captain America: The First Avenger, as well as a slew of other films set during WWII.
The story then centers on Apollo trying to take over as King of Olympus due to his father Zeus' absence and Wonder Woman's efforts to protect Zola from him, as it is prophesied that one of Zeus' children will be his downfall which Apollo considers to be Zola's child.[73][74] Wonder Woman receives the power of flight by one of Hermes' feathers piercing her thigh and Zola's baby is stolen by Hermes at the end and given to Demeter. The issue's last page shows a dark and mysterious man rising from the snow, taking a helmet and disappearing.[74] Issues 7–12 are collected in a hardcover titled Wonder Woman Vol. 2: Guts, scheduled for release in January 2013.[75]
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